Twilio ($NYSE:TWLO) is a "beast." 

Don't take our word for it, take Wells Fargo's. Analysts are bullish on the remote maketing, sales, and CRM company's "innovative, extensible" platform, and titled its summary of the company's post-earnings presentation "Beast Awoken." Shares have nearly doubled in an otherwise uber-bearish 2020 for markets and the cloud communications software company saw revenue soar thanks to the lingering lockdown. Data suggests Twilio expects that to continue. 

For a long time, growth in headcount (tracked via our LinkedIn Headcount tracker, in blue above) was tightly tied to growth in share price. 

Year-over-year Twilio headcount has risen more than 50% - so the cloud company was well-prepared for when its cloud services saw demand soar last quarter once the entire world needed to shelter-in-place. Based on how other countries' reopenings - and recalibration of their reopenings after they encounter a rise in Coronavirus cases - have gone, it's looking like Twilio will be busy for a while, and well into 2021. 

CEO Jeff Lawson reminded Marketwatch that this isn't his first recession, after the company's earnings report sent shares skyrocketing May 7. But then again, based on the way his company is posting jobs, Twilio looks as if it would be immune to the ongoing market downturn, since it keeps posting new jobs - and now at a near-record clip. 

Job postings from Twilio have risen more than 50%, as headcount has grown my more than that as well, signaling that the San Francisco-based provider of cloud communications services still plans on growing. And, why not? From telehealth to tele-happy hour (or funerals) to a growing roster of big tech products geared at whole corporate workforces, plenty of people are communicating via video these days. It may not change for a while, and Wells Fargo said the company has a "favorable setup" for "the rest of the year." 

If only there were more stocks in the market like it. 

About the Data:

Thinknum tracks companies using the information they post online - jobs, social and web traffic, product sales, and app ratings - and creates data sets that measure factors like hiring, revenue, and foot traffic. Data sets may not be fully comprehensive (they only account for what is available on the web), but they can be used to gauge performance factors like staffing and sales. 

Further Reading: